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Sherburnflyer92

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He's referring to the board as "scoundrels". What an absolute tool. Like pathetic tantrum from clearly a toddler.

Like you've said @TheLocalYokel why not return the £60 million pound dividend he's just received? Or is the fat pig greedy soft enough to take it and then moan about how this company is run. I have 0 sympathy for him, i hope the £600 million pound is rescinded from the government and the government tell them to get they're in house relations in order first.

He slowly is becoming a worse Michael O'Leary of the airline world.
 
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TheLocalYokel

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After a lot of criticism from many quarters about the difficulty in obtaining a fare refund, easyJet appears to have made things simpler and possible.

Until recently everything was geared on their website to either transferring the booking to a future flight or accepting a voucher to be used in the future. Whilst they hinted that it was possible to receive a refund their website took people on a circular tour that ended where it began with everything aimed at either transferring the booking or accepting a voucher.

The phone helpline option was useless because it was never answered and quickly cut out.

Now they have an option on their website to access an online Refund Request Form which is fairly simple to find even though they still emphasise transfer of flight or voucher as the first options.

I've submitted the form this evening and I await developments but it might take a while because although they aim to complete the refund within 28 days they also say rather ominously that if nothing has happened after 90 days they should be contacted again.

Had the owners been more willing to help their own airline I might have been receptive to a voucher but when they take getting on for £200 million out of the business as dividend payments I don't see why I should help them to remain solvent if they are not willing to help themselves.

 

TheLocalYokel

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After a lot of criticism from many quarters about the difficulty in obtaining a fare refund, easyJet appears to have made things simpler and possible.

Until recently everything was geared on their website to either transferring the booking to a future flight or accepting a voucher to be used in the future. Whilst they hinted that it was possible to receive a refund their website took people on a circular tour that ended where it began with everything aimed at either transferring the booking or accepting a voucher.

The phone helpline option was useless because it was never answered and quickly cut out.

Now they have an option on their website to access an online Refund Request Form which is fairly simple to find even though they still emphasise transfer of flight or voucher as the first options.

I've submitted the form this evening and I await developments but it might take a while because although they aim to complete the refund within 28 days they also say rather ominously that if nothing has happened after 90 days they should be contacted again.

Had the owners been more willing to help their own airline I might have been receptive to a voucher but when they take getting on for £200 million out of the business as dividend payments I don't see why I should help them to remain solvent if they are not willing to help themselves.

I've now had an email from easyJet acknowledging receipt of my refund claim with the same comment that is on their website that they aim to complete within 28 days but if I haven't heard after 90 days to contact them again.
 

airforced

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May 5, 2010
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Keep us posted LocalYokel as it seems as though easyJet have responded to the criticism that was flying around willy nilly. I must say that Jet2 handled the refund for my holiday in Majorca in a very timely manner even though it took some work from me to get the wheels turning initially.
 

KARFA

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Jun 3, 2014
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Why not just do a chargeback?

For your case it would be because U2 are in breach of the legal obligation under Art 8 EC261 to refund within 7 days for a cancelled flight. I fully understand things are taking longer than normal atm, and I am not suggesting doing a chargeback at 7 days and 1 minute. Personally I don't mind waiting a few weeks. However, for one of mine with AY they were doing a deliberate go slow on all refunds, and are doing very little to attempt to process the backlog of 100k. It is clear I would have been waiting for months. Based on that after 3 weeks I did the chargeback and amex have now agreed to it and credited the money back to my card.

I really do not suggest waiting for 28, or even 90 days for a refund.
 

TheLocalYokel

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If he's really worried about the airline he could begin by returning the £60 million in dividend payments he reportedly received this year.

The last thing the easyJet senior management and board need at this potentially cataclysmic time for aviation is to have their eyes taken off the ball on the pitch in order to address the sideshow of this man's endless obsession.

This could be seen as an encouragement to employees to break the terms of their contract with their employer.
 

BlueManc

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19 May 2020

easyJet plc

('easyJet' or the 'Company')



Notice of cyber security incident

Following discussions with the Information Commissioner's Office ("ICO"), the Board of easyJet announces that it has been the target of an attack from a highly sophisticated source. As soon as we became aware of the attack, we took immediate steps to respond to and manage the incident and engaged leading forensic experts to investigate the issue. We also notified the National Cyber Security Centre and the ICO. We have closed off this unauthorised access.

Our investigation found that the email address and travel details of approximately 9 million customers were accessed. These affected customers will be contacted in the next few days. If you are not contacted then your information has not been accessed. Other than as referenced in the following paragraph, passport details and credit card details of these customers were not accessed.

Our forensic investigation found that, for a very small subset of customers (2,208), credit card details were accessed. Action has already been taken to contact all of these customers and they have been offered support.

We take issues of security extremely seriously and continue to invest to further enhance our security environment.

There is no evidence that any personal information of any nature has been misused, however, on the recommendation of the ICO, we are communicating with the approximately 9 million customers whose travel details were accessed to advise them of protective steps to minimise any risk of potential phishing. We are advising customers to continue to be alert as they would normally be, especially should they receive any unsolicited communications. We also advise customers to be cautious of any communications purporting to come from easyJet or easyJet Holidays.

We're sorry that this has happened, and we would like to reassure customers that we take the safety and security of their information very seriously.

easyJet is in the process of contacting the relevant customers directly and affected customers will be notified no later than 26th of May.

Customers can also find further advice at www.actionfraud.police.co.uk



easyJet Chief Executive Officer Johan Lundgren said:

"We take the cyber security of our systems very seriously and have robust security measures in place to protect our customers' personal information. However, this is an evolving threat as cyber attackers get ever more sophisticated.

"Since we became aware of the incident, it has become clear that owing to COVID-19 there is heightened concern about personal data being used for online scams. As a result, and on the recommendation of the ICO, we are contacting those customers whose travel information was accessed and we are advising them to be extra vigilant, particularly if they receive unsolicited communications.

"Every business must continue to stay agile to stay ahead of the threat. We will continue to invest in protecting our customers, our systems, and our data.

"We would like to apologise to those customers who have been affected by this incident."
 

TheLocalYokel

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According to the linked BBC report easyJet were aware of the attack as long ago as January yet it's only now that they are going public and contacting the nine million customers involved.

The reason for this long delay is according to easyJet the fact that the attacker was 'highly sophisticated' and it took time to understand the scope of the attack and to identify who had been impacted.

The BBC report also says that when British Airways became a victim of hackers in 2018 they were fined £183 million by the Information Commisioner's Office and that compensation payments to customers could reach £3 billion.

Under Data Protection Regulations if easyJet is found to have mishandled customer data it could face fines up to 4% of its worlwide turnover.

I'm following this with interest as I booked several easyJet flights at the beginning of this year.
 

TheLocalYokel

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Sherburnflyer92

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Sad news for those at easyJet.

I thought the whole point of the job retention scheme was to keep the jobs? And what was the point of the £600million from the government. I do wonder how many of these will be UK based and then spread around the European bases.
 

Carl0927

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Coathanger16

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I thought the whole point of the job retention scheme was to keep the jobs?
The job retention scheme essentially covers the period when we're in lockdown. Employees can't work, so the government pays their salaries so the company doesn't have to lay them off.

The redundancies we're seeing at airlines is because airlines are all predicting that they will be smaller post-Covid as demand will be lower than it was for a number of years. It would be financially very difficult for an airlines to keep on 30% of their workforce and pay them whilst there is no need for them.
 

TheLocalYokel

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Further update from the BBC.

"We're going to look to do whatever we can to optimise the network," said easyJet CEO Johan Lundgren. "And that means that we also can't exclude that there will be base closures."
 

rollo

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Aug 26, 2014
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The whole point of the furloughing scheme was and is to allow companies to retain employees while they assess the future of the company meanwhile the government will have eventually pick up the tab for the several million people who most unfortunately find themselves out of work through no fault with their own.

When I say the government will pick up the tab which ever way they choose it will mean significant tax rises for everyone one way or another and definitely not just the wealthy whichever government is in power.
 

TheLocalYokel

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According to the linked BBC report easyJet were aware of the attack as long ago as January yet it's only now that they are going public and contacting the nine million customers involved.

The reason for this long delay is according to easyJet the fact that the attacker was 'highly sophisticated' and it took time to understand the scope of the attack and to identify who had been impacted.

The BBC report also says that when British Airways became a victim of hackers in 2018 they were fined £183 million by the Information Commisioner's Office and that compensation payments to customers could reach £3 billion.

Under Data Protection Regulations if easyJet is found to have mishandled customer data it could face fines up to 4% of its worlwide turnover.

I'm following this with interest as I booked several easyJet flights at the beginning of this year.
easyJet knew about the hacking in January this year but it wasn't made public until 19 May.

In the BBC report published at the time easyJet said that it would notify everyone affected by 26 May. I received an email from them yesterday - the 29 May! - telling me that my name, email address and travel plans had been hacked. So they couln't even keep to their own timetable for informing those affected.
 
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