Stargazing

JENNYJET

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Hoping something good arises from this endeavour, I struggle to see what good comes from looking backwards in time, it may satisfy Physicists and loosely Historians or Theologians but not my little brain! I agree with others, the images will perhaps be something else to behold.
 

Jerry

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Hoping something good arises from this endeavour, I struggle to see what good comes from looking backwards in time, it may satisfy Physicists and loosely Historians or Theologians but not my little brain! I agree with others, the images will perhaps be something else to behold.
Part of the mission is also to look for more exoplanets in star systems which could one day be explored by mankind and also learning about the universe billions of years ago can only expand our scientific knowledge of the universe and how it was formed.
 

JENNYJET

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Yes, it may satisfy the Historian but can it solve the problems of today? I am not against the telescope just being Devil's advocate! or a bloody minded lawyer, take your pick!
 

Kevin Farnell

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Yes, it may satisfy the Historian but can it solve the problems of today?
It will help add knowledge to the overall Scientific database. We never know when this newly acquired knowledge may be of benefit, but it will have it's uses at some point. The Human race is an inquisitive species and without that, I doubt we would have progressed further than living in caves. In fact, fire and the wheel would probably have been beyond us. More likely our species would have become extinct. We need exploration, to satisfy our hunger for advancement.
With all due respect, Human Laws are just that - Human Laws. These can be interpreted differently in different countries, or even different times and do not apply to other species (when Humans are extinct, so will be their Laws). The laws of Physics (or the Laws of the Universe) are universal. Humans cannot put forward an argument against Physical Laws, and thus have them changed. We can only observe and revise our understanding based on new facts. A great example, is that Newton's Laws of Motion still perfectly describe the motion of the planets in the Solar system (and, thus the graviational effects they have on each other). However, on a much grander scale they break down and it took Einstein to develop his Theory of Relativity to explain new observations. Observations that came about from advancements in Scientific knowledge. Perhaps, the James Webb Telescope will reveal new data that will require amendments to the Theory of Relativity - only time will tell.

Kevin
 

JENNYJET

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I agree totally about human laws, so open to interpretation and terribly complex to a practitioner, and I add again, for the benefit of members, I do not practice the law, just avail myself of the subject in specific areas. As fascinating to me as a science is to a Scientist.

I am probably not making myself clear with regards to the telescope, partly because of the absence of sufficient knowledge and skills to put across my views satisfactorily. For that, I apologise.
 

Kevin Farnell

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The delightful Dr Rebecca 'Becky' Smethurst has just released a YouTube video, featuring the planetary alignment that I previously referred to (along with other Astronomical delights, such as the bright light that will pass over the UK at around 6:50am on the 25th Dec - is it Father Christmas' sleigh, or the International Space Station?). The planetary alignment is the first part of the video, so you don't need to watch it all, but there are other delights included.


Kevin
 

Elmdon80slad

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New one of mine - moon with some cloud.

E.
DSC-1083-Edit-2.jpg
 

Kevin Farnell

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Just had a great view of the Moon showing as a crescent (tipped back about 45degrees), with Jupiter directly above it. Also visible, was the Earthshine on the Moon. The crescent is lit directly by the Sun, but the unlit portion gets light reflected back from the Earth making it faintly visible. Looks great, but very difficult to photograph as the crescent is so bright.
The Moon is now below the horizon from the UK, but might be worth looking out for tomorrow just after dark (weather permitting).

Kevin
 
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