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The Continuing Saga of Brexit... (Part II)

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“Against this background, it has become impossible for the airline’s shareholders to continue their extensive programme of funding into the business, despite investment totalling over £40m in the last six years. We sincerely regret that this course of action has become the only option open to us, but the challenges, particularly those created by Brexit, have proven to be insurmountable."

Fly BMI

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By upside does David Davis mean "belly up" .
 
“Against this background, it has become impossible for the airline’s shareholders to continue their extensive programme of funding into the business, despite investment totalling over £40m in the last six years. We sincerely regret that this course of action has become the only option open to us, but the challenges, particularly those created by Brexit, have proven to be insurmountable."

Fly BMI

View attachment 12322

By upside does David Davis mean "belly up" .
They have known Brexit is coming so they've had plenty of time and could've scrapped their EU bases.
I do think Brexit can be an ideal excuse that may hide the real reason.
The fact that they've put 40 million in over 6 years may well suggest bigger problems.
In the end you have to feel sorry for the staff this evening.
 
They have known Brexit is coming so they've had plenty of time and could've scrapped their EU bases.
Does that really make good business sense for an airline that had flights between European cities. It would have meant fundamentally changing their business model.

It is simple, Brexit is bad for the airline industry.

There is no doubt that the UK regional airline business is in crisis. Brexit and the path it is inevitably leading us to is not one which provides us with a platform for stability in the aviation industry. Brexit was supposed to rid us of "bureaucratic red tape" but if anything we're knocking down bridges and building walls making it harder to do business with our close European counterparts.

In the meantime our avid Brexit supporters are leaving the country.

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I'm always cautious when companies blame Brexit for their problems. In some cases that might be a valid reason but in others it's a ready-made excuse for other failures.

flybmi has been unreliable for well over a year in its operations. Last year it was cancelling a dozen or more rotations some weeks from BRS alone, with the first part of 2018 particularly badly affected. I remember posting earlier last year that I would never take the risk of booking with them because of their many cancellations. It was rumoured the reason was a lack of aircraft and crews.

Was the demise of the likes of Germania, Primera, VLM , Small Planet, Sky Works and Cobalt within the last year placed at Brexit's door? This is not a rhetorical question. It's a genuine one.
 
Was the demise of the likes of Germania, Primera, VLM , Small Planet, Sky Works and Cobalt within the last year placed at Brexit's door? This is not a rhetorical question. It's a genuine one.
As far as I know the answer is no but then none of them were UK firms though they did operate many of them to and from the UK.
flybmi has been unreliable for well over a year in its operations. Last year it was cancelling a dozen or more rotations some weeks from BRS alone, with the first part of 2018 particularly badly affected. I remember posting earlier last year that I would never take the risk of booking with them because of their many cancellations. It was rumoured the reason was a lack of aircraft and crews.
That is one of the reasons why I didn't consider them to fly back from Frankfurt at the end of April and choose Lufthansa to Heathrow instead.
 
There is a cost implication for UK airlines wanting to maintain flights between Inter EU European cities. Airlines face a number of challenges related to Brexit as well as non related to Brexit. It has been widely publicised that the EU is likely to suffer the consequences of Brexit, not just the UK. Several airlines have now said Brexit is having a significant impact on their business.

"Jet2 boss warns of ‘extremely damaging’ effects of no-deal Brexit for airlines"

"Holidaymakers have Blue Air flights cancelled over Brexit ‘impasse’"

"Why Hard Brexit Could Rip Up Five Million Flight Tickets"
 
Brexit blamed as airline cancels Liverpool services
by Samantha Mayling Feb 15th 2019, 15:25
Brexit blamed as airline cancels Liverpool services
Romanian carrier Blue Air has cancelled some services from Liverpool John Lennon Airport, with Brexit uncertainty reported to be a factor.

A statement from the airport said: “Blue Air has successfully operated its based aircraft for two years in Liverpool serving a wide range of routes.

“Unfortunately as a Romanian Air Operator Certificate (AOC) holder, the current Brexit impasse means that the carrier has been unable to receive the necessary clarity regarding their ability to operate seventh freedom services which are currently possible under EU Open Skies.

“The carrier will continue to serve Liverpool John Lennon Airport and will increase flights this summer to Bucharest and Bacau.”

Seventh freedom services under the European Union Open Skies agreement refer to flights between countries which are not an airline’s home country.

The Independent reported that dozens of passengers expecting to fly to Rome and Alicante complained their flights with Blue Air had been cancelled on Wednesday night.

Blue Air currently serves Liverpool, Luton, Birmingham and Glasgow in the UK.

The newspaper said that the airline announced earlier this month that it was downsizing its operations at Liverpool, where the airline plans to offer services from Bacau and Bucharest only.

Blue Air flights from Luton have also been affected, and a Luton airport spokesman said the summer schedule to Turin, starting at the end of March, is no longer on sale.

However, the Blue Air services from Luton to Bucharest and Iasi in Romania, and Larnaca in Cyprus, are still on sale.

Travel Weekly has contacted Blue Air for a response.

More: New Blue Air Liverpool routes set for take off


From Travel Weekly


Not forgetting Liverpool received some bad news this week regarding Blue Air, with Brexit sited.
 
That definitely is down to Brexit but it does make you wonder why they waited so late as they'd have never have gone for a UK AOC just for 1 aircraft!
It is an odd one for sure, unless they were hoping for some sort of breakthrough for 29 March, seems highly unlikely.
 

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