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Brexit

Comments

#41
I have to say, this time last year the UK aviation industry was very much more buoyant than it is right now. I've just been looking through airport press releases and there's just nothing happening.
Please feel free to send any fifty pence pieces that you don't want to me!
At least they're not Euros!

Kevin
We have no problem in spending those Euros when we want our 2 week holiday, however that isnt the issue here.
 

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#42
Only one man to blame - David Cameron. I frequently use swear words when his name crops up.
To be fair I blame Labour - if they’d have done the right thing and elected David Milliband as their leader instead of that idiot brother of his I truly believe Labour would still be in power today. I’m no Tory but if Labour were to win the next general election Diane Abbott would be Home Secretary and that is a scary thought indeed!
 
#43
To be fair I blame Labour - if they’d have done the right thing and elected David Milliband as their leader instead of that idiot brother of his I truly believe Labour would still be in power today. I’m no Tory but if Labour were to win the next general election Diane Abbott would be Home Secretary and that is a scary thought indeed!
Diane Abbott gives me nightmares :devil:
 
#45
I'm centre ground myself and there's nothing out there for me at the moment. I have voted just about every way you can vote in the past but I've no idea who I'd vote right now if we had a general election.
 
#46
I'm centre ground myself and there's nothing out there for me at the moment. I have voted just about every way you can vote in the past but I've no idea who I'd vote right now if we had a general election.
Same here; Labour are a complete shambles while the Tories are a party divided - I’m no fan of Theresa May but as far as I can see she’s the best of a bad lot. Heaven help us if BoJo gets in!
 
#47
The greater malaise is that there is a massive shortage of talent in politics full stop. That shortage is apparant throughout Europe as well. Seems those who can, are avoiding that bear pit and sensibly going to do something else with their life. What we are left with are the second raters, never made its and wannabees with axes to grind (n):jawdrop::wtf:...If you look at Trump then I suppose its worldwide as well
 
#48
The greater malaise is that there is a massive shortage of talent in politics full stop. That shortage is apparant throughout Europe as well. Seems those who can, are avoiding that bear pit and sensibly going to do something else with their life. What we are left with are the second raters, never made its and wannabees with axes to grind (n):jawdrop::wtf:...If you look at Trump then I suppose its worldwide as well
I’d say it’s worldwide. Australia have had i don’t know how many PM’s in recent times.
 
#49
But the Commission never lets the public stand in the way of its agenda.......
Your accurate, albeit somewhat long winded post, sums up the past, current and possible future scenario the UK faces following Brexit. What was missing, unless I had my eyes closed at the time, was the fact that the majority of voters said yes to Brexit not because of immigration, money for the NHS or our wish to sign new trade deals all over the world. We said yes then and remain of the same opinion now because we were totally fed up of the Brussels federalist agenda which ignores the views and wishes of the Member States and their populations. We haven't fallen out with our neighbours it is just the Brussels machine and Barniers of this worls we want rid of.

There may be some pain but as with all pain it will subside and you will then wonder what all the fuss was about. Just get on and do it.
 
#50
I voted to join the common market in 197?. We were conned then by Edward Heath. There was no mention of the common market morphing into the United states of Europe which I believe has been the objective all along. Had the people of the UK been told the truth then, we would probably have voted to stay out. To me the EU is totally un-democratic. Who voted for Junkers or Tusk? Certainly not the peoples of Europe.
 
#51
Who voted for Junkers or Tusk?
The people we and other EU nation citizens voted for.
I think one of the main problems in the UK is a general lack of political knowledge and how not just the EU works but the UK as well and it's down to politics not being taught in schools as a compulsory GCSE.
 
#52
Hay I've no problem at all if people form their political opinions based on facts. By facts I mean fact checking various sources and not just by a quick flick through the Express or the Daily Mail or a glance at the Independent or Dailly Mirror.

It infuriates me when people just say "get on with it" when they have absolutely no idea of the planning involved with such a mammoth task. It's something we have to get right first time as we all have to live with it however it pans out.

The fundamental laws of the European Union are set out in the Treaties. All Treaties have to be agreed and ratified by the member states national governments. A treaty is ratified when it becomes part of the law of the member states. So no, Barnier and Tusk aren't the EU rule book, National governments are.

Any Brexit deal will have to be ratified in the same way as any other involving the remaining EU member state governments.
 
#53
There in lies part of the problem you have twenty eight soon to be twenty seven countries deciding on something all with their own version of what they would like and after much flaffing around sometimes for years they end up with a compromise which sounds fine except that no country gets what it wanted originally although Germany and France may well be an exception so maybe hence Brexit and calls to just get on with it.
 
#54
EU facts behind the claims: UK influence

The British government has voted against EU laws 2% of the time since 1999
Official EU voting records* show that the British government has voted ‘No’ to laws passed at EU level on 56 occasions, abstained 70 times, and voted ‘Yes’ 2,466 times since 1999, according to UK in a Changing Europe Fellows Sara Hagemann and Simon Hix.
In other words, UK ministers were on the “winning side” 95% of the time, abstained 3% of the time, and were on the losing side 2%.
This is counting votes in the EU Council of Ministers, which passes most EU laws jointly with the European Parliament.
 
#55
Interesting figures but inevitably practically all will be votes of compromise so not wins or losses which seems sensible but somehow we end up with things like a fisheries policy which encourages perfictly edible already dead fish to be thrown back so bigger more valuable fish can be landed, huge subsidies through the CAP for farmers and the madness of duplicate parliaments.

It's a bit like the old joke of forming a committee of twenty eight experts to design a race horse and after much discussion they come up with a donkey.

However it all turns out I'm pretty sure people will look back in a few years and wonder what all the fuss was about as apparently the two sides are supposedly 95% in agreement so doubtless one big compramise will be the end result and life will go on.
 
#56
Interesting figures but inevitably practically all will be votes of compromise so not wins or losses which seems sensible but somehow we end up with things like a fisheries policy which encourages perfictly edible already dead fish to be thrown back so bigger more valuable fish can be landed, huge subsidies through the CAP for farmers and the madness of duplicate parliaments.

It's a bit like the old joke of forming a committee of twenty eight experts to design a race horse and after much discussion they come up with a donkey.

However it all turns out I'm pretty sure people will look back in a few years and wonder what all the fuss was about as apparently the two sides are supposedly 95% in agreement so doubtless one big compramise will be the end result and life will go on.

Nail..Hammer..Head..................well said
 
#57
Interesting figures but inevitably practically all will be votes of compromise so not wins or losses which seems sensible but somehow we end up with things like a fisheries policy which encourages perfictly edible already dead fish to be thrown back so bigger more valuable fish can be landed, huge subsidies through the CAP for farmers and the madness of duplicate parliaments.
As much as I understand the frustration regarding the EU fisheries policy, it has succeeded in doing what it set out to do which was to stop the depletion of fish stocks. I agree in that it doesn't seem right to throw huge numbers of fish back into the see but this just highlights the incredible over use of our natural resources.

What the UK decides to do in the future will have to take into account over fishing if we are to continue to have a fishing industry at all.

It is my opnion we will leave the EU with a temporary deal and so the debate will continue to rumble on for years to come.
 
#58
..................t is my opnion we will leave the EU with a temporary deal and so the debate will continue to rumble on for years to come.
I'm afraid that I have to agree with that Aviador except I don't think that whatever is agreed will be described as a 'temporary deal'. That would be a too honest admission for a politician to make.

We can't trust any politician, of whatever political persuasion, whether they be in the UK or the EU to tell us the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Why? Because they are all inveterate liars. Whatever they end up telling us will be spun to sound like a victory and pad their ego. So both side will end up achieving their desired outcome which we all should be gratefull for!!

Those who believe any of this when it happens will have been conned once again.

As has been mentioned previously in this thread we have been had by these people since time immemorial so it would be wrong to expect anything different today. Maybe a little cynical but truthfull I'm afraid.

The good thing about it all is THAT WE WILL ALL WIN!!!!!
 

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