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Ethiopian Airlines

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi in Kenya crashed shortly after take-off. It's been confirmed that all 157 people on board (149 passengers and eight crew) have lost their lives.

It's said that the pilot reported difficulties and had asked to return to Addis Ababa.

This is the second incident involving the 737 Max 8 after a Lion Air aircraft crashed into the sea off Indonesia five months ago killing the 189 people on board.

It's very sad news and eveyone's condolences will reach out to the loved ones of those lost.

On a personal note my ears pricked up when I first heard Nairobi. Our son and his partner are flying back to Heathrow from Nairobi this evening with BA. Ironically, she was nervous about taking an internal Kenyan flight with a local airline.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-af...ines-crash&link_location=live-reporting-story
 
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Comments

#2
How sad and my thoughts and prayers are with everybody involved in this terrible tragedy.

On another note Boeing are going through a terrible time at the moment with there brand new jets the 737 max and the problems with the 787.

:(
 

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#3
It's the second brand new 737MAX to crash in similar circumstances. Let's hope Boeing can find what caused today's accident quickly so to avoid any further accidents.
 
#4
Do to fly on Ethiopian in June from Manchester to Victoria Falls. I am quite likely to cancel the booking, I'm not keen on going on the 737MAX. Will probably with to SAA from Heathrow.
 
#5
Do to fly on Ethiopian in June from Manchester to Victoria Falls. I am quite likely to cancel the booking, I'm not keen on going on the 737MAX. Will probably with to SAA from Heathrow.
That's a shame Carl, you really would cancel your flight becouse of the 737Max ?

If that is the case then Boeing have a serious problem just about to start.
 
#6
As ever, it's far too early to speculate on the cause of the accident. From what I gather, Ethiopian proud themselves on having a young fleet of aircraft with one of the best safety records in Africa.
 
#7
That's a shame Carl, you really would cancel your flight becouse of the 737Max ?

If that is the case then Boeing have a serious problem just about to start.
I've seen a few comments online expressing concerns that there flights could be on the MAX. I think people need to remember that Norwegian and Turkish and American and no doubt other airlines have all been operating them without problems.
 
#9
I've seen a few comments online expressing concerns that there flights could be on the MAX. I think people need to remember that Norwegian and Turkish and American and no doubt other airlines have all been operating them without problems.
That may well be true but it may also be a hidden design fault that allows the aircraft type to appear to function normally up until such point as an unrecovererable malfunction takes place.

My completely unqualified opinion is that there is likely to have been a catastrophic failing of some kind to cause such a devistating accident.
 
#12
I must admit I was staggered by the number of comments on social media calling for the 737 MAX to be grounded and of people saying they would cancel their bookings if they were flying on the 737 MAX.

Whilst of course every aspect of this flight needs to be examined, people shouldn't jump to the conclusion that it's a problem with that specific aircraft.

There a currently 350 737 MAX's operating with over 30 airlines, and it has been in commercial operation for just under 2 years.

Aviation safety is one of the most rigorous in the world and is held up as an example to others. Following the incident in Indonesia last year, Boeing issued advice to airlines to prevent a similar incident occurring.

As others have said, Ethiopian Airlines prides itself on having a young fleet and a highly safe operation, and so this advice should have been disseminated, certainly to all crew, as well as anybody else who may require such knowledge within the company. As such its highly unlikely the cause of this incident was the same as the Lion Air incident.

I'm not saying the two are definitely completely unrelated, just advising people to not jump to conclusions.
 
#13
The Chinese CAA have grounded all 737Max operated by Chinese airlnes about sixty aircraft involved. The authorities state similarities between yesterday's crash and the earlier Lion Air crash. Also Cayman Airlilines have grounded there two Max aircraft.
 
#15
It is perverse in some ways that most of us have at least a slightly uneasy view of air travel but appear to have no qualms about venturing onto the roads most days where most drivers don't have the training, ability or skill that airline pilots possess when it comes to flying aircraft.

Some people get behind the steering wheel with medical conditions they don't declare or perhaps don't even know about, with unroadworthy vehicles, sometimes without ever having held a driving licence. A few years ago I drove past a local shopping street about a minute before a car ploughed onto the pavement and killed a mother and child. The driver had suffered a fatal heart attack. He wasn't even elderly; he was in his 40s. Had he been a commercial pilot the regular medical checks might have detected something. This is one example to show how road travel is potentially and indeed actually far more dangerous than air travel.

The figures prove it anyway. If people were being killed in UK air accidents each at the rate they are killed on our roads annually the aviation industry would be in crisis.

I suppose the thing is that aviation fatal incidents tend to be major whereas road deaths are spread throughout the year and only merit front page news if a coach/bus crash or multiple motorway pile-up kills many people.

Everyone must make their own decision about flying and I entirely respect their conclusion.
 
#16
A friend of mine who supplies the aeronautic industry said Boeing are aware of the problem and have done nothing so far to sort it. It has something to do with the 3 computer system the aircraft has installed, which are not working properly.
 
#17
A friend of mine who supplies the aeronautic industry said Boeing are aware of the problem and have done nothing so far to sort it. It has something to do with the 3 computer system the aircraft has installed, which are not working properly.
You could well be right Carl..so far Boeing and the FAA are giving the impression of having their fingers in their ears, sing LA LA LA...with both eyes on the changing stock price.......

On the other hand, I understand TUI are coming under serious pressure via social media to re assure their prospective customers. Although they seem to be `As above` as well.....shame on them all
 
#19
You could well be right Carl..so far Boeing and the FAA are giving the impression of having their fingers in their ears, sing LA LA LA...with both eyes on the changing stock price.......

On the other hand, I understand TUI are coming under serious pressure via social media to re assure their prospective customers. Although they seem to be `As above` as well.....shame on them all
I think the UK has now banned the aircraft, along with Australia.
 
#20
I'm convinced banning them is the right thing to do at this point until the cause of the accident is clarified. One accident is too many. The decision by the CAA to suspend 737 MAX flights also means passengers worried about flying on the aircraft no longer have to worry about booking new flights at their own financial loss to avoid using the aircraft. I for one would be worried silly if I was due to fly on one without knowing the airworthiness of the aircraft I was flying on.
 

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