How concerned are you about the Coronavirus?


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Worrying reports across the news over recent days regarding the Caronavirus. How concerned are you?
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Carl0927

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Dec 19, 2016
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Cheshire
According to press reports 6 thousand attended , 3 stabbed 1 rape and a man died in Manchester raves. Then you have protests and counter protests in London ( watching the News looks link BNP thugs ) and other cities, and we are trying to get to a safer position with the Corona Virus in the country for citizens. Depressing !
 

Kevin Farnell

Platinum Member
May 21, 2013
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www.flickr.com
Good to see that it's a drug already in use for treating other ailments. This means that it has already undergone full clinical trials and any side effects will we well known and understood. It should therefore not be a problem to start using it straight away, as long as enough can be manufactured.

Kevin
 

aviatorconcorde

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2018
682
63
South East Wales
You think you’re having a hard time in England with covid?

Well, the Welsh Government promised 20,000 tests a day capacity in Wales, 9,000 a day were supposed to take place at the end of April I believe.

Currently we are running at 2,000 per day. Absolute shambles with the all care home tests completed target also failing to be met.
 

rollo

Platinum Member
Aug 26, 2014
1,165
133
Complete farce, the government has abandoned it's tracking programme and will use the Google/Apple system like most of the rest of the world you know the one that actually works.

It reminds me of Ronald Reagan saying many years back if you want a project that is late, over budget and fails to work put the state in control, just hopeless and I'm a natural Tory.
 

TheLocalYokel

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Staff member
Jan 14, 2009
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Yes

I'm always cautious about reading too much into any stats but, reading this at face value, the country seems to be back to par in terms of numbers of deaths with those resulting from Covid not adding to the five-year average at this time of the year.

It could of course be argued that without Covid this year would have been one of those years significantly below the five-year average.
 

aviatorconcorde

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2018
682
63
South East Wales
Everyone has their own ideas. Perhaps the real story will only be known in, say, 50 years from now when historians look back.
You never know. I’m sure this will be a point in History that will be remembered.

No question that the UK has the highest death rate in Europe - but I do wonder if perhaps Italy/France/Spain test differently to us and record deaths differently. So they may be closer to us in terms of deaths than thought? Just a theory.
 

Coathanger16

Platinum Member
Sep 29, 2016
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Horsham
No question that the UK has the highest death rate in Europe - but I do wonder if perhaps Italy/France/Spain test differently to us and record deaths differently. So they may be closer to us in terms of deaths than thought? Just a theory.
Belgium has consistently ranked highest in Europe in death rates - currently 841 deaths/million population vs 642 deaths/million population in the UK - something they claim is down to the fact that they include deaths from people who were suspected of having Covid whereas other countries only include deaths from those who tested positive.

From what I've read over the past few months, the UK is more like Belgium in its criteria than the rest of Europe. I believe our system is that if Covid is on the death certificate it counts as a Covid death. The death certificate has 3 parts: Cause of Death, contributing factors, and other health issues. Because of this, someone could pass away after a 10 year battle with cancer, but the day before they died they tested positive for Covid - they would therefore count as a Covid death in the statistics.

Equally I've heard of GPs putting Covid on death certificates of those over 70 "just to be safe" as they're more scared of not reporting Covid than over-reporting.

As such the number of excess deaths IMO becomes the key indicator.

As someone who keeps track of the data and looks at it on a daily basis, though I must make clear I'm no expert, the data would suggest that as a country, we're more or less back to the level we were at just before lockdown. In the 7 days prior to lockdown there were just under 4300 new cases. During the peak this increased to just over 36,000 new cases in 1 week. In the last 7 days just under 6700 people have tested positive. When you consider that at the start of lockdown we were doing barely a few thousand tests a day, whereas now were up to almost 200,000 thousand a day on a regular basis, and that at the start of lockdown only a limited number of people were eligible for testing, whereas now everyone is provided you have symptoms, I strongly suspect that the number of cases in the community is less than at the start of lockdown.

From memory the week prior to lockdown was hardly any different than 12 months ago. Pretty much nobody practiced social distancing, there was no queueing for supermarkets, no hand sanitiser in shops. Consider all the protections we have in place now, plus a track and trace system, I feel fairly confident that any "second wave" will be localised in nature like Leicester is experiencing now.

I'm not advocating going back to pre-Covid normality now, but that the situation is not as dire as the media constantly makes out - just heard Jeremy Vine say Leicester has gone back into lockdown indefinitely - if that's the state of the media no wonder people are terrified!
 

TheLocalYokel

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Jan 14, 2009
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What I find extremely annoying is the expression 'new normal'. Makes it sound as if life will never be the same again. Did they say that in 1918/1919 when modern researchers calculate that 20-50 million people died from Spanish Flu (that would be more than 60-150 million nowadays, taking into account the respective world populations then and now).

Or were they more positive about life then and expected things to get back to the 'old normal' pretty quickly? Which they did.
 

Coathanger16

Platinum Member
Sep 29, 2016
1,512
143
26
Horsham
What I find extremely annoying is the expression 'new normal'. Makes it sound as if life will never be the same again. Did they say that in 1918/1919 when modern researchers calculate that 20-50 million people died from Spanish Flu (that would be more than 60-150 million nowadays, taking into account the respective world populations then and now).

Or were they more positive about life then and expected things to get back to the 'old normal' pretty quickly? Which they did.
I read an article the other day where the headline was something like "Just 6% of the population want things to go back to how they were pre-Coronavirus" - sounds pretty shocking until you read into the article and the bulk of people don't want things to go "back to normal" because they want the government to invest more in certain things that they thought were lacking before - i.e. NHS, transport, education, etc.
 

aviatorconcorde

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2018
682
63
South East Wales
What I find extremely annoying is the expression 'new normal'. Makes it sound as if life will never be the same again. Did they say that in 1918/1919 when modern researchers calculate that 20-50 million people died from Spanish Flu (that would be more than 60-150 million nowadays, taking into account the respective world populations then and now).

Or were they more positive about life then and expected things to get back to the 'old normal' pretty quickly? Which they did.
Well, I do wonder if we could ever see a second wave in certain parts of the world as the way the United States of America and Brazil are suffering with covid, large portions of their population are going to have some sort of resistance to it!
 

TheLocalYokel

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 14, 2009
14,416
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Wurzel Country
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A damning Reuters exposition of the government's and senior health officials' response to the coronavirus from the beginning. It's a lengthy piece but worth reading if anyone has the time.
 
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