Lord Botham


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TheLocalYokel

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Sir Ian Botham is to be elevated to the peerage. He will sit as a cross-bencher. He is a strong Brexit supporter.

A number of politicans, former politicians and others have been given peerages and other honours.

I suppose the about-to-be ennobled Lord Botham is deserving of congratulation although I'm not a fan of the unelected House of Lords system.

I wonder if he will take an appendage to his title: Lord Botham of Nempnett Thrubwell has a nice Somerset ring to it.
 

JENNYJET

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No better person. Sir Ian, as he remains until introduced to the Upper House, is most deserved of a peerage unlike the political nominees. I think The Baron Trumpton or Worcester is appropriate. I am flabbergasted that Philip May has been awarded a Knighthood for holy knows what!
 

Jerry

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Absolutely ridiculous that a cricketer gets placed in the House of Lords just because he's pro brexit! How qualified is he to actually scrutinise the laws that'll pass through there? It just makes the House of Lords an even bigger joke.
 

TheLocalYokel

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No better person. Sir Ian, as he remains until introduced to the Upper House, is most deserved of a peerage unlike the political nominees. I think The Baron Trumpton or Worcester is appropriate. I am flabbergasted that Philip May has been awarded a Knighthood for holy knows what!
Boris has a lot to thank Philip May for. When his wife (Mr May's that is) called a snap general election that lost her overall majority at Westminster the proponents were supposedly the PM herself, her husband and two advisers who all went on a walking holiday at Easter in Wales (or was it the Lake District?) and came to the snap decision.

Who knows how the TM government would have played out had she not lost that majority? It's conceivable that she would have somehow got out of the Brexit maze and the current PM would still be on the back benches or editing a newspaper somewhere.
Absolutely ridiculous that a cricketer gets placed in the House of Lords just because he's pro brexit! How qualified is he to actually scrutinise the laws that'll pass through there? It just makes the House of Lords an even bigger joke.
Not the first. Colin Cowdrey became Baron Cowdrey of Tonbridge and Learie Constantine was also ennobled. Furthermore, other test cricketers have sat in the Lords as a result of hereditary peerages. Then there was David Sheppard who later became the Bishop of Liverpool.


.
 

rollo

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Absolutely ridiculous that a cricketer gets placed in the House of Lords just because he's pro brexit! How qualified is he to actually scrutinise the laws that'll pass through there? It just makes the House of Lords an even bigger joke.
Sorry jerry couldn't disagree more he has raised many millions for his charitable works for leukemia and the people in much less privileged circumstances the us in the UK. He has always stood up for Britain and was a half decent cricketer.


Until the Lords become an elected chamber as it should be (200 hundred would do) its fine by me.
 

JENNYJET

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In the question of being qualified to scrutinise as a legislator, I would count a majority of MPs being qualified only because Joe Public says so. The real experts, the Academics and vocational professionals tend to become Peers of the Realm and normally unaligned or crossbenchers and not pursued by electors or media creatures.

Examples:

Glenda Jackson, Giles Brandreth, Martyn Bell & Boris Johnson.
 

Jerry

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Sorry jerry couldn't disagree more he has raised many millions for his charitable works for leukemia and the people in much less privileged circumstances the us in the UK. He has always stood up for Britain and was a half decent cricketer.
And that's what knighthoods and MBEs are for, to reward work like that. Not election to the upper house of Westminster to scrutinise and ammend laws passed in the House of Commons.
 

JENNYJET

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A grant of Peerage is a Royal one, the Letters Patent will have therein the conditions and any restrictions, the main one being non hereditary. Unless it is a political grant, the requirement to sit in Parliament does not exist .

Sir Ian is to be created a Baron, the lowest rank of peer but a recognition by the Monarch for past deeds as has always been the case. Political appointments are as the relevant party stipulates, to represent in the Upper chamber the interests of the Government or Opposition of the day. Ministerial appointments may follow. Thus, two different breeds, one is a politician the other is simply a Lord or Lady with the optional right to sit in the House and participate using discretion i.e. Knowing when not to speak! Before Oliver Cromwell intervened, Parliament was populated by Barons, Viscounts Earls and Dukes loyal to Charles 1 and his predecessors.

I apologise for the lecture but Constitutional Affairs was a major element in my Law studies and has a large historical foundation and helps explain where we are today in the United Kingdom.

Finally, I would prefer Sir Ian in the House rather than Ant and Dec!
 

superking

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Well reserved as well.He never knew when he was beaten. Its a shame Bob Willis passed away as i think he should have been a lord as well. I always remember the test match between England and aus that was very much taken away by Aus,but Botham and Willis came into bat and with some good hitting they turned the game round and won it forEngland. Botham did a lot of charity walks,but will be remembered for his cricket.I watched him many times when i followed Somerset and he was a exciting player to watch.
 

Jerry

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Well reserved as well.He never knew when he was beaten
It still doesn't qualify him for sitting in the legislature of the country. To vote and ammend the laws of the country passed by ELECTED officials. It's not even as if he's served time as an MP like many of them have. It's sheer cronyism, he's a prominent brexiteer so he's your reward. Even the Speaker of the House of Lords is not happy about all their appointments as the understanding was that the amount of Lords is to be reduced. The House of Lords has 830 members! The elected House of Commons only has 650! It's a complete farce and shows how deeply corrupt Westminster politics is! Yet people seem to think that he deserves it because he was a good cricketer? And people wonder why I want an independent Wales.
 

TheLocalYokel

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It still doesn't qualify him for sitting in the legislature of the country. To vote and ammend the laws of the country passed by ELECTED officials. It's not even as if he's served time as an MP like many of them have. It's sheer cronyism, he's a prominent brexiteer so he's your reward. Even the Speaker of the House of Lords is not happy about all their appointments as the understanding was that the amount of Lords is to be reduced. The House of Lords has 830 members! The elected House of Commons only has 650! It's a complete farce and shows how deeply corrupt Westminster politics is! Yet people seem to think that he deserves it because he was a good cricketer? And people wonder why I want an independent Wales.
It's been ever thus. Many hereditary peers have no political experience either and some probably don't want any.

I said earlier that there have been other cricketers ennobled and some who were hereditary peers (with these you have to go back a century or more usually - Lord Hawke for example, the martinet of Yorkshire cricket in the late 19th/early 20th century). Think also of the number of distinguished actors who have been created life peers, and the bishops of the Church of England, a number of whom (26?) are there because of their job. Retired senior members of the armed services are sometimes elevated to the peerage as are one or two very senior former police officers such as erstwhile Metropolitan Police commissioners. Many other professions and occupations have featured and still feature in the membership of the Lords.

Lord Halifax was the preferred choice of King George VI and of many in the Conservative Party to replace Chamberlain as prime minister in 1940. It was recognised that Halifax would have found leading a government from the Lords extremely difficult, but not impossible (he was already foreign secratary), although he didn't want the top job anyway - Churchill craved it and got it. In those days peers were stuck with the title until they died and so it remained until Anthony Wedgwood Benn successfully fought for the law to be changed in the early 60s to enable him to renounce his late father's title (Viscount Stansgate) and return to the Commons as Tony Benn MP.

Had the King's view prevailed the country would have been led by an unelected peer thoughout the dark days of 1940 and beyond, although Halifax was one of those hereditary peers who was an experienced political animal.

I don't like the principle of an unelected second chamber but I recognise that it's part of Britain's long history and easier said than done to change it root and branch. There have been many attempts to do so down the years with as recently as 2007 a Commons majority voting for an elected second chamber after a debate.

I have said on a number of occasions in the CWL forum and elsewhere on F4A that I am in favour of Welsh independence if the Welsh people so desire, but I would be surprised if an independent Welsh government eschewed cronyism completely, whatever its political colour. It would be an unusual government if it did.
 

Jerry

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I don't like the principle of an unelected second chamber but I recognise that it's part of Britain's long history and easier said than done to change it root and branch. There have been many attempts to do so down the years with as recently as 2007 a Commons majority voting for an elected second chamber after a debate.
I'm sure that reform of the House of Lords has been an ongoing topic for the last 120 years. I think the reality is that no PM wants an elected second house that the opposition could control so they just don't bother or do half hearted reform like Blair did.

I have said on a number of occasions in the CWL forum and elsewhere on F4A that I am in favour of Welsh independence if the Welsh people so desire, but I would be surprised if an independent Welsh government eschewed cronyism completely, whatever its political colour. It would be an unusual government if it did.
I guess it depends on the makeup of the constitution that'll no doubt be drafted after a Yes vote. Many small countries like New Zealand and Estonia only have 1 chamber while others have 2. Whether Wales had 1 or 2 no doubt would be decided during the draw up of a constitution.
 

JENNYJET

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The United States have two elected chambers as stipulated in the constitution following independence and occasionally, disputes between the houses force the shutdown of the federal government. In United Kingdom, the Commons have primacy as the elected chamber whilst the Lord's are the revising and general debating chamber with no power to alter any finance or state security measures. They may however propose and introduce bills to which the Commons must pass before becoming statute law.

So the actors and ball hitters will have little impact on proposed legislation other than voice concern if they do not recuse themselves. The Bishops represent the established church since Ecclesiastical Law in England requires to be underscored by the state.

I hope this helps reduce the heat somewhat!
 
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