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CAA Grounds Boeing 737-MAX

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CAA Grounds Boeing 737-MAX amid safety concerns

A spokesperson for the UK Civil Aviation Authority said: "Our thoughts go out to everyone affected by the tragic incident in Ethiopia on Sunday.

"The UK Civil Aviation Authority has been closely monitoring the situation, however, as we do not currently have sufficient information from the flight data recorder we have, as a precautionary measure, issued instructions to stop any commercial passenger flights from any operator arriving, departing or overflying UK airspace.

"The UK Civil Aviation Authority's safety directive will be in place until further notice.

"We remain in close contact with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and industry regulators globally."
 
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#3
A very good move by the CAA..coming up to Easter it will be re assuring to many travellers..Lets see how long it takes Boeing to respond!!
 
#4
I agree that it was the right thing to do until they can establish the cause of the problem.
 
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#5
Apparently 737 MAX 8’s that are already en-route to the UK will be allowed to complete their journey.
There are a couple of TUI to Manchester and Turkish flights to Gatwick & Birmingham.
 
#6
Apparently 737 MAX 8’s that are already en-route to the UK will be allowed to complete their journey.
There are a couple of TUI to Manchester and Turkish flights to Gatwick & Birmingham.
Looking at FR24 the two Turkish flights now appear to have turned around.
Birmingham turned near Würzburg Germany and Gatwick turned near Prague.

Edit: this tweet shows it better:
 
#9
[QUOTE="Jerry, post: 162794, member: 8474"]FAA though and the Canadian version haven't grounded it though.[/QUOTE]
To misquote a statement by a witness in a notorious 1960s British criminal trial, "They would do that". Boeing is a massive US corporation.

The FAA might find itself out of step with everyone else soon though and have to take action.
 
#10
[QUOTE="Jerry, post: 162794, member: 8474"]FAA though and the Canadian version haven't grounded it though.
To misquote a statement by a witness in a notorious 1960s British criminal trial, "They would do that". Boeing is a massive US corporation.

The FAA might find itself out of step with everyone else soon though and have to take action.[/QUOTE]
I'd like to think that they'd put safety first but Boeing does have a software upload for it, for the MCAS system i think it is, which i believe they will solve the problem. There was a pilot on 5Live who said that with the MAX the MCAS system was never mentioned to pilots. So something from Boeing in the training part seems to have gone wrong.
 
#11
I agree with the grounding of the MAX because of the similarities in the incidents, I was looking at flightradar last night there were lots of MAX's doing long and short hauls in the US area, strikes me that the US is probably the biggest users of such type? and haven't had any problems, perhaps that's where their confidence is coming from. Boeing/FAA would though be in deep doo doo if something like this happens in the US.
 
#14
Are you saying that Norweigian would continue to fly the Max if they weren't grounded by the Authorities but the individual Airlines were choosing to ground them?
I think it's a perfectly valid statement to make IF it's a manufacturing issue.
 
#15
http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/artic...ll-boeing-manufacturer-for-737-max-disruption

Desperate cries from the boss of Norweigan air. "We will be invoicing Boeing for this disruption" - is that because Mr Norwegian you're carrier up the creek without a paddle in regards to its financial position?
I think it's reasonable to seek compensation. It's no different than airlines seeking compensation from airports if they fail to clear snow.

An airline should be able to expect their aircraft hardware to be deficiency free.
 
#16
I’m saying it’s ideal for them to get a bit more cash. It’s no secret that they are not good financially. I don’t see TUI for example publicly saying they’ll get some money back.

Instead they’ve made the statement saying they’ll continue the programme regardless. Norwegian should say that and leave the refunding behind the doors instead of trying to stabilise the markets by saying they’ll be chasing a refund - or as I see it “a cash injection”.
 
#17
I think it's reasonable to seek compensation. It's no different than airlines seeking compensation from airports if they fail to clear snow.

An airline should be able to expect their aircraft hardware to be deficiency free.
As per the post above, TUI, Ryanair and every other airline hasn’t publicy said this. Only Norwegian. They are not doing well and it’s no secret even MOL says they’ll be next. Should keep things like this private and behind scenes.
 
#18
The American FAA is still refusing to ground the 737 Max 8s. I wonder what its attitude would have been if the aircraft had been a type of Airbus.
The CEO of Ethiopian Airlines is saying all 737 max8 should be grounded worldwide, siting similarities to the Lion air crash.

The boss of Ethiopian Airlines has called for the grounding of all Boeing's 737 Max 8 aircraft until it is established they are safe to fly.
Many countries have already suspended the plane after one the airline's jets crashed on Sunday minutes after take-off, killing all 157 people on board.
Tewolde Gebremariam told the BBC that although the exact causes were still unknown, there were similarities to a Lion Air crash last October.
But US officials say the jet is safe.
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said a review had showed "no systemic performance issues" and that there was no basis for grounding the aircraft.

credit BBC
 
#20
Boeing does have a software upload for it, for the MCAS system i think it is, which i believe they will solve the problem
Boeing: "Our Max 8 aircraft are perfectly safe and there's no reason to ground them. In the meantime, we'll be applying a software patch that should stop the aircraft from nosediving into the ground at 400 miles per hour."

I cannot believe that they have allowed themselves to be dragged into put safety first. The cautious thing would have been to put out an advisory to recommend grounding as soon as the earliest reports suggested some similarities between the Lion Air and Ethiopian crashes. The message would have been perfectly simple: "we believe that the MAX generation of 737 aircraft is safe to operate. However, due to potential similarities due to the recent crashes, we feel it prudent to recommend the aircraft be grounded whilst we run some more tests on some of the computer controls to identify any issues that hadn't been anticipated , and look forward to returning the MAX fleet to the skies as soon as possible."
 
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