Advertisement


Birmingham Airport - General Thread


Advertisement


Ianbutty

Platinum Member
Feb 29, 2016
923
123
Essex
It all just bores me to death BHX. :bored:
Given that the national media is bashing the aviation and airport industry over its environmental credentials the recent look how green we are press releases are to be expected. Plus maybe there is some good growth news to get the we will be green PR in place before those smelly polluting noisy pesky planes start landing from the east.
 

Brum X

Premium Member Plus
Mar 23, 2011
4,272
360
43
Birmingham UK

58terminus

Platinum Member
Sep 23, 2016
1,075
133
birmingham
The airport has teamed up with the Birmingham Royal Ballet to become it's first ever Principal Partner (or, Community Engagement Partner).
Cannot work out if "Principal Partner" is an attempt at humour or not. Maybe the ballet association was completely missed by the PR dept?
Who knows? "Community Engagement Partner".Now you know they are back on familiar turf.
 

Ray Finkle

Moderator
Staff member
Apr 22, 2012
11,679
265
Birmingham
One thing that I noticed during a quick scan of the master plan document is the early morning departure restrictions imposed by NATS as there is insufficient airspace in the South East for the number of aircraft to fly through (see below).

It's not something that I really considered before but I can see how it could affect based and potential based aircraft who need the early morning slots for maximum aircraft utilisation.


The runway is capable of handling around 40 movements (arrivals and departures) per hour. However, its capacity is currently restricted by Minimum Departure Intervals (MDIs) that are imposed by NATS, the UK’s national en-route provider of air traffic services, during the early morning departures peak because there is insufficient airspace in the south-east for the number of aircraft that need to fly through this area. These MDIs increase the separation between successive departures routing southbound from Birmingham from seven nautical miles to fifteen nautical miles.

The Civil Aviation Authority, as the national supervisory authority for the planning and regulation of national airspace, must resolve this issue by prioritising airspace modernisation that impacts regional airports. It has a responsibility to ensure that UK air space is developed to meet demand in line with the Government’s overarching policy of making best use of existing runways.

Source: The 2018 master plan.
 

58terminus

Platinum Member
Sep 23, 2016
1,075
133
birmingham
One is wondering ...Why them? What do they bring to the table? Which party benefits from the link?
It's a good question Jenny but i fear we are both of an age where the workings of a modern PR dept. is a mystery.
Maybe it will encourage more people and airlines to use the airport but, you know what? I doubt it.
But it keeps people in work during a period when they seem to think have nothing to promote on the aviation side.
 

Otisblue

Active Member
Jul 20, 2017
46
43
62
Birmingham
One thing that I noticed during a quick scan of the master plan document is the early morning departure restrictions imposed by NATS as there is insufficient airspace in the South East for the number of aircraft to fly through (see below).

It's not something that I really considered before but I can see how it could affect based and potential based aircraft who need the early morning slots for maximum aircraft utilisation.


The runway is capable of handling around 40 movements (arrivals and departures) per hour. However, its capacity is currently restricted by Minimum Departure Intervals (MDIs) that are imposed by NATS, the UK’s national en-route provider of air traffic services, during the early morning departures peak because there is insufficient airspace in the south-east for the number of aircraft that need to fly through this area. These MDIs increase the separation between successive departures routing southbound from Birmingham from seven nautical miles to fifteen nautical miles.

The Civil Aviation Authority, as the national supervisory authority for the planning and regulation of national airspace, must resolve this issue by prioritising airspace modernisation that impacts regional airports. It has a responsibility to ensure that UK air space is developed to meet demand in line with the Government’s overarching policy of making best use of existing runways.

Source: The 2018 master plan.
I suspect we are going to have to wait for the modernisation of UK air space project to be completed which will provide more capacity


The video about half way down shows what NATS are proposing...looks quite a change to how aircraft are handled now
 

Advertisement


Top Bottom