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Leeds Bradford - General Thread


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Bigman

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Jan 14, 2009
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#2
I don't know if anyone has noticed, but the planning application for the terminal work is on the Leeds City Council new Plans List for w/e 8.1.09.
 

54xhg

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Jan 21, 2009
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#4
Hi,Is anybody else able to watch watch the webcam provided by multiflight? It just keeps saying timed out when i try to have a look.
 

Aviador

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It doesn't work for me either and it hasn't worked for me since Multiflight got into trouble for broadcasting the RT on their webcam feed. All said, my Internet speed is shockingly slow!
 

Bigman

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#6
Looks like Rynair have dropped the afternoon flight this summer. probably due to their announcement today about removing 4 aircraft from Dublin.
 

Bigman

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#7
In fact, only Leeds, Manchester and Barcelona are losing flights from Dublin. Doesn't bode well for us.
 

White Heather

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#8
There is clearly a demand for more flights to DUB, so no reason why Jet2 could not operate the route. Perhaps it is time FR didn't have things all their own way. They have had a monopoly on the route for too long and this just might give another airline an opportunity. Even better than Jet2 would be Aer Lingus returning. They compete with FR on the NCL route so why not LBA too?
 
Feb 10, 2009
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#9
Bigman said:
In fact, only Leeds, Manchester and Barcelona are losing flights from Dublin. Doesn't bode well for us.
Those reductions do not equate to 4 aircraft, so I expect the cuts to be much more widespread.
 

rmac

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#10
In the past I have wondered if Aer Lingus might operate the LBA Dublin route with connections on to the US as all other connections are via LHR or AMS, maybe BRU and possibly FRA in the future. Now might be a good time to consider it.
 

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rmac said:
In the past I have wondered if Aer Lingus might operate the LBA Dublin route with connections on to the US as all other connections are via LHR or AMS, maybe BRU and possibly FRA in the future. Now might be a good time to consider it.
They operated on the route before using Saab 340 aircraft.

Bigman said:
Looks like Rynair have dropped the afternoon flight this summer. probably due to their announcement today about removing 4 aircraft from Dublin.
Does this mean that we will have only one flight a day to Dublin? It comes as no real surprise to me. Some of their flights have been going out with less than 60 passengers on and that's even after the previous kull.

On the bright side, a very busy day today and it looks like tomorrow will be busy too, plus Jet2's Sharm el Sheikh starts tomorrow.
:clapping:
 

wawkrk

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Jan 17, 2009
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Aer Lingus also operated Shorts 330/360, BAC 1-11, B737-200.
Also I believe on one occasion an Airbus A330 which then continued to the USA.
A day trip using a 747 was proposed but finally cancelled through lack of support.
 

White Heather

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#13
Ryanair will be operating twice daily in the summer, just as they are now. It is the FR154/155 that used to operate in the early afternoon that has been lost as far as I can see. In the summer last year the Dublin route was the airport's busiest, with most flights carrying excellent loads, and this cut is purely down to Ryanair's bust up with Dublin Airport Authority (yet ANOTHER bust up!!).

If ever there was a chance for another airline to muscle in and given Ryanair a run for their money it is now, despite the economy. Even if the economy improves, there is a good chance that we will never get back the 3rd flight until Ryanair restore the based aircraft. They have also, incidentally, pulled aircraft out of Shannon and axed some routes from there.
 

White Heather

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#14
Further to wawkrk's comments, it was a sad day when Aer Lingus quit LBA as they were the first foreign registered airline to operate scheduled services from the airport.

They actually commenced in the early 60's with a DC3, upgrading later to a Fokker F27, and the to the Viscount 800. Eventually they started with the 737-200 (the first airline to fly one into LBA on the unextended runway) and then the BAC 1-11, but later dropped the route and left it to Northeast Airlines (later to become part of British Airways).

When Aer Lingus came back it was initially with a Shorts 330, quickly upgrading to the Shorts 360. Not being particulaly popular with customers, the Shorts was eventually replaced with the Saab 340, and finally the Fokker 50, which is what they were using when they pulled out again, although they did occasionally use one of their BAe146's when loads were high or the F50 had gone tech. I would love it if they were to come back although I am not sure they would be up for a fight with FR on the route.
 

Bigman

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#15
Don't forget the 737/500's that sometimes used to make visit. And yes, Aer Lingus provided our first ever A330.
 

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Airport looks to resume flights to capital

LEEDS Bradford International Airport is in talks to resume flights from Yorkshire to the capital following the decision by bmi to end its daily service to Heathrow.

The airport's chief executive John Parkin said that he hoped that an announcement can be made about a new service from Leeds Bradford to London before bmi services end on March 28.

News that bmi was dropping the service to Heathrow - and bringing to an end a direct service from the region to the capital which has run since 1969 - was greeted with dismay by users of TheBusinessDesk.com, many of whom were critical of the airport in comments on this website.

However Mr Parkin confirmed that the airport has been working hard for some time to secure a new service to one of the London airports and still plans to continue with its £70m investment plan despite the economic downturn.

"We are engaged in discussions now about services to the capital. Ideally we would like to be in a position to make some announcements before bmi's service ends at the end of March.

"It's quite important we energise those discussions," said Mr Parkin, who said he could not reveal which airlines or London airports were involved because discussions are at a "sensitive" stage.

Responding to the criticisms levelled at the airport, Mr Parkin said: "It is not as simple as people might perceive."

He said that the operating costs for airlines had risen including higher charges from Heathrow owner BAA combined with the costs of the Government' Airp Passenger Duty.

"The Heathrow route was operated by bmi Mainline whereas the other routes from Leeds Bradford to Glasgow, Edinburgh and Brussels are operated by bmi Regional.

"bmi Mainline is business focused and business passenger numbers are falling."

Mr Parkin said that bmi Regional has an "active agenda" and the airport has an "ongoing dialogue" with the business.

He said that he sees German carrier Lufthansa's takeover of bmi as a positive move.

"It's a pretty good outcome for bmi because it is joining a very strong and robust airline.

Mr Parkin said that while the outlook for airlines is not particularly positive, LBIA is pushing ahead with its expansion plans.

"Unless the economy picks up airlines are going to be consolidating pretty severely across Europe. Our strategy is for expansion and we have a great deal of faith in the further development of the airport," he added.

LBIA was bought by private equity firm Bridgepoint in May 2007 for £145.5m from the five West Yorkshire local authorities that owned it.

Bridgepoint - previously a shareholder at Birmingham airport - has a £70m investment programme to drive passenger numbers from the current figure of 2.9m a year to more than 5m over the next five years.

It brought in the former chief executive of Newcastle and Bristol airports, John Parkin, to spearhead the growth.

Major redevelopment work is due to be carried out to expand the terminal which will include more space for shops and food outlets.

Source
 

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Former Newcastle Airport boss lands £2m pay-off

BONUS-ROW airport boss John Parkin has received an out of court settlement worth more than £2m, figures out today reveal.

The former chief executive at Newcastle International had initially pocketed a massive £6.3m payout which was linked to a multi-million pound refinancing deal.

Controversy surrounded the fat cat £8.5m package to be shared between Mr Parkin and the now-deceased airport finance director Lars Friis.

Mr Parkin quit after being suspended and legal action was launched by the airport, which is 51% owned by North East councils, to grab back the cash.

But an eleventh-hour deal was struck before the High Court hearing started and accounts out today reveal details of the settlement for the first time.

They show the airport has managed to claw back more than £4.7m of the controversial cash, but that £3.8m will still go to 54-year-old Mr Parkin, now chief executive of Leeds Bradford airport, and the estate of Mr Friis.

Mr Parkin alone will pocket more than £2m – nearly 10 times the annual salary he enjoyed at Newcastle International.

But the exact detail of how the sky-high bonus packages were sanctioned in the first place are subject to a strict confidentiality agreement.

Today Coun Nick Forbes, leader of the opposition Labour group on Newcastle City Council, said: “I am astonished that people working for an organisation, of which more than half is owned by local councils, have been able to agree bonuses of this scale. The legal case was rightly pursued and presumably it was felt it could be successfully fought.

“Therefore, if a settlement has been reached, with multi-million pound bonuses still being paid out and a large legal bill run-up in the process, the public has a right to know how and when this was allowed to happen.

“When you take into consideration the fact there are households on Tyneside surviving on less than £10,000 a year, the sums involved, even after this settlement, are staggering.”

Mr Parkin spent five years as managing director of Bristol International Airport before coming to Newcastle in June 2002, in the wake of the Twin Towers terrorist attack. He had also previously worked at P&O, Princess Cruises Europe and Thomas Cook Group.

While in charge, he oversaw the arrival of cut-price travel at the airport, including easyJet setting up a base in 2003.

He was suspended in March 2007 over what were described as “certain personal contractual issues” and resigned the following May, shortly before the legal action was revealed. In September 2007, his appointment as chief executive of Leeds Bradford was announced.

Accounts released by Companies House today for 2007 revealed the bonuses to be paid to Mr Parkin and Mr Friis were £8,547,000. By the end of 2006, payments totalling £6,297,000 had already been made.

The package related to the refinancing of the airport’s debt, which led to a dividend of £80m being paid to all the local authorities who have a shareholding.

The airport has previously confirmed the bonus payments were negotiated between the company’s remuneration committee and the individuals concerned.

The committee was made up of the non-executive directors of the airport, chaired by Rosemary Radcliffe, who has resigned from her position. The others on the panel were William Brooks, Rasmus Christiansen, Coun Iain Malcolm, of South Tyneside Council, and John Stent.

A writ was filed with the Queen’s Bench Division of the High Court and a hearing was scheduled in London for October 2008 but before it could take place, it was announced the out-of-court agreement had been reached.

South Tyneside Council is the lead authority of the so-called LA7 councils of Northumberland, Durham, Newcastle, North and South Tyneside, Gateshead and Sunderland, who hold the 51% stake. The other 49% is owned by Copenhagen Airports.

An airport spokeswoman said: “Newcastle International Airport Ltd has today published its annual report and accounts for the year ending December 31, 2008.

“We can confirm that the accounts contain the effect of the settlement reached with the former executive directors of the company.”
. :shok:
 

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