Aviador

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Now Eastern Airways are partnering with Flybe does anybody think we will see more routes from Humberside Airport, the home of Eastern Airways?
 

Jerry

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Now Eastern Airways are partnering with Flybe does anybody think we will see more routes from Humberside Airport, the home of Eastern Airways?
Flybe do Jersey so maybe they would look at Newquay say once a week?
 

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Eastern in it's comfort zone is business flights on niche routes mostly related to the oil industry. Flybe on the other hand has a considerably larger audience. I would expect many more routes to be viable from the Humber region than what Eastern presently operates. Whether Eastern and Flybe will be able to deliver more routes from Humberside airport remains to be seen.
 

pug

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Long time no post. Thought I'd add for once.

I doubt any new services will be forthcoming, not entirely sure what the reason is for this agreement, but hopefully it won't be to the detriment of Eastern or the remaining operations at HUY.

As for new routes, not looking promising at all, there appears to be a lack of interest at management level, and the routes that would be touted have been tried and failed ad nauseam. Management have publicly stated that low-cost airlines are not being sought. So no return of Ryanair and the like.

The vague hope that Eastern would try some more frequent routes to the med with their new E-jets appears to have come to nothing. Meanwhile, Flybe appear to be doing quite well on their DSA operation.

That's the future I think. KLM and helicopters.
 

TheLocalYokel

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Many thanks, pug, Good to see you back.

I wonder why HUY isn't seeking low cost airlines. The footfall they can bring would feed the ancillary revenue streams at the airport such as retail and car parking. I say ancillary revenue streams but for many smaller airports these have become a major source of income given that the low-cost airlines pay relatively little to fly from such places.

Now that Eastern is to an extent subsuming itself into Flybe is there a chance that it might seek to sell its majority stake in HUY?

HUY has certainly fallen away in terms of passenger numbers from the days a decade ago when it was handling over half a million a year.
 

a300boy

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Probably too close to Robin Hood for Tui to do any more flights than they have at Humberside.
Robin Hood is their focus for Yorkshire with a smaller summer operation at Leeds.
 
Oct 7, 2016
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Eastern now have a co-operative relationship with Flybe, so there must be some prospect of a modest increase in Flybe's leisure operations from Humberside (HUY).
The managing director of HUY has stated that their prime target is new business routes. The British Airways/Sun Air routes to Aalborg/Billund ended when the Siemens training programme was completed. There must be scope for further Danish routes as the wind energy industry expands, but the size of the Flybe aircraft would rule them out as the likely operator.
She also said that passengers should not expect new low-cost operations at HUY. This implies that the required subsidies would be greater than the expected car park and retailing income flows.
Financial results of airports such as Liverpool and Doncaster, where airline subsidies are paid, suggest that this could be true.
For commercial reasons, very little information on contracts is available in the public domain (except when something does not go according to plan, resulting in models, actors and actresses having to be hired to act as passengers in order to meet targets!).
Why is Bristol Airport so profitable compared with Liverpool when both have Easyjet as a primary operator?
 

Jerry

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but the size of the Flybe aircraft would rule them out as the likely operator.
I'd imagine although they would be under the Flybe name any new routes would be on Eastern aircraft and initiated by Eastern.
Why is Bristol Airport so profitable compared with Liverpool when both have Easyjet as a primary operator?
Probably because there is double the amount of traffic going through BRS compared to LPL and a lot more of it may well be business related. Yes LPL may have FR and EZY but they don't have KLM or BMI or TOM long haul plus the airports themselves may well be run in different ways and have different costs like rent for instance and different extra revenue streams.
 

TheLocalYokel

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Bristol was still profitable when it was about the same size as Liverpool, passenger number-wise. It may well be due to the old adage 'speculate to accumulate'. After BRS became part-privatised in 1997 and then fully privatised in 2001 the various owners since then have ploughed in the equivalent of over £300 million on infrastructure at today's values which is a lot of money for an airport of BRS's size - hasn't fully resolved over-crowding at certain times of the day though. Adroit ownership and management decisions have also helped.

Bristol serves a fairly large and wealthy primary catchment, both business and leisure, with significant secondary catchments. It might be that low cost airlines don't demand quite the same sort of 'deal' that they might at some other smaller regional airports in order to tap into this catchment.

Cruzeiro makes an interesting point about HUY with the suggestion that low-cost airlines would in effect cost the airport more than it would make from them. Like the South West, Humberside is a peripheral region of the country and has to fight to to stand any chance of getting recognition alongside the large metro regions.
 
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The point about Humberside's catchment area is well made. A large proportion of it is completely uninhabited. Ironically, the uninhabited areas provide HUY (by helicopter and supply vessels) with some of their higher yielding passengers. A new contract has been signed for two helicopters to provide transport, from April 2018, for the new Hornsea offshore wind farm .
As a result of the high proportion of business traffic, the yield on HUY's KLM route is the fourth highest of their 17 UK routes.
Eastern did not operate any of the recent Danish routes. They seem to be fully stretched at present with their new western network and Flybe joint venture routes. Their J41 fleet is very usefully-sized, but may be nearing an age when replacement would be contemplated.
 

Jerry

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I read somewhere that they are going to replace their J41s with ATR42s eventually.
 

Finger66

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Looking at fleet replacement logically is that the first of their ATR72s is now on board. That means a logical fit with ATR42s which are probably just as economic to operate as their now ageing J41s. Fleet/manufacturer commonality can be such an asset to any airline. As the tie up/merger with Flybe grows both ATRs would be a great fit for Flybe as their other franchise partner, Stobart Air already fly these for Flybe. You can see where I am going with this........
 

pug

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I'm not sure catchment areas can be defined as arbitrary circles drawn on a map. The local population - within the 30 minutes drive time - is actually quite large. The problem is the relative low incomes and the low propensity to fly.

That says, whenever a leisure route has been offered from HUY, the loads are always in the 90's. Unfortunately after the low cost boom at the beginning of the 2000's, which HUY missed out on due to focussing on its IT/Charter operation, small regional airports have become undesirable. This is probably largely due to the major airports adapting and reclaiming lost passengers. I think this effect has stunted DSA to a degree (it opened a few years too late) and there are many cases of airports losing huge amounts of footfall and some closing altogether.

When compared to its counterparts of similar size, perhaps HUY hasn't fared too badly after all.. Though it's a shame to stand in an empty terminal whenever I visit to fly privately.
 
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